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Dealing with Rejection During the Job Search
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Dealing with Rejection During the Job Search

1. Depersonalize the rejection.
Companies make decisions on the basis of many factors. They may have really liked you, but you may not have had the experience, a certain technical skill, or the right style to fill a role. It's quite possible it really is them and not you.

2. Do a reality check.
As candidates sell themselves to a company, sometimes they start to over sell themselves on how great a role is. Identify factors that were likely not to be a good fit, including parts of the job you wouldn't have enjoyed or elements of the culture that would have been annoying. Ask yourself if you were really a good fit for the roles and responsibilities of the position.

3. Realize it's their loss.
As with anyone who misses out on your talents and abilities, it's best to realize that they are the ones who lose out. Nobody likes this excuse, but companies make bad hiring decisions all the time. It's quite possible they made a mistake, and maybe that says something about the company in the first place.

4. Follow-up.
While not all companies will respond to candidates they reject, they are often willing to share a little feedback with candidates who came close to getting the job. Follow-up with your key contacts, thank them, and let them know how much a role like this is something that you would like in the future. Then ask for feedback.

5. Stay on their radar.
Just because you were rejected from a specific role, doesn't mean they didn't think you were impressive. After all, only one person can be hired for one role. Stay in touch with the recruiter or hiring manager. Don't do so in a needy way, but rather touch base from time to time just to stay connected. If something else comes up, this will help you stay top of mind.

6. Be graceful.
As with staying on their radar, nobody likes a poor loser. So in defeat, stay positive and friendly. Thank everyone for their time, and offer to help in the future if there is ever an opportunity. Some of the best jobs come from referrals so even if they didn't hire you, they may know someone who is looking for someone similar to you.

7. Keep on truckin'.
Use the negative energy of rejection to renew your job search. Retake a look at your resume, start networking aggressively, and work on scheduling more interviews.

8. Find the positives in your current world.
So you have been rejected and may have to return back to an unfavorable work scenario. It's wise to accept that another "close call" may take some time, and it is best to come in and do your best in your current role. Something great will come along, just stay positive and patient.

Posted on: 2016/11/7 13:46
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Are You Betting on the Wrong Job References?
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Are You Betting on the Wrong Job References?


Imagine this scenario: you are an employee of McKesson Corporation (MCK) and have just learned that yours is one of the 1,600 jobs the company has announced will be slashed. In completing a new employment application—perhaps for one of the 52 new jobs Braeburn Pharmaceutical will add to their North Carolina facility over the next 5 years—you are asked to identify a number of references (typically 3-5) for prospective employers to contact. In putting your best foot forward, you list those who will provide the most glowing reviews of your professional abilities.

However, it's unlikely that these well-chosen references will be the deciding factor on whether you get that hoped-for new position. The truth is, prospective employers typically look first at the name in the "Former Supervisor" box on your job application, and whether you authorize it or not, your previous supervisor may well get a call from a prospective employer.

Does this mean that your references are no longer important? Quite the contrary—they remain critical to your future employment prospects. However, the key is in understanding who are your critical references, and it is not personal acquaintances, friends or casual associates. Most important are your former supervisors and Human Resources department at your previous places of employment. Employers understand that while confirmation of your dates/title are all that a previous employer is supposed to provide, supervisors are frequently willing to offer them the candid input they seek

If you anticipate a poor reference from your former supervisor, what is your best course of action? One recommendation is to have a third-party reference checking firm like Allison & Taylor check your key references prior to beginning your job search. If you receive a “neutral” (employment dates/title) confirmation then you can rest easier that this reference will not cost you future employment. However, if a supervisor, HR representative or other party offers negative commentary about you (which, unfortunately, is a very common occurrence) consider a “Cease & Desist” letter issued through an attorney to the senior management of your former employer. Such letters are extremely effective, as the party receiving the letter tends to have little tolerance for someone within their company who is exceeding company policy in offering negative commentary and (in so doing) putting the company at legal risk.

Also note that some negative commentary may be illegal—e.g. defamation of character, discrimination, wrongful discharge, etc.—and you may have stronger legal recourse than a Cease & Desist letter.

In summary, understand that the job references who will “make or break” you are typically your former supervisor and Human Resources department. Never assume that they will follow the verbal indication they may have given you—you simply have too much at stake. Instead, conduct your due diligence and have their input documented by a third party. If negativity is uncovered, you will have some level of recourse as described above and ensure that your new employment opportunity presents itself sooner, than later.

By Jeff Shane

Posted on: 2016/4/4 23:21
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Do’s and Don’ts in Holiday Card Etiquette
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Here are some reasons why a traditional greeting card is a good idea:

1. Connecting with your bosses (or a former boss) will help keep you top-of-mind in their awareness, translating to possible future support or opportunity.

2. Staying in touch with bosses and colleagues via a holiday card is a subtle yet highly effective form of networking. (It's also less expensive than taking them to lunch, and won't violate corporate edicts if sent via personal mail.)

3. Sending your bosses (also former bosses, colleagues, suppliers, etc.) a card demonstrates a personal touch to accompany your business relationship.

4. Staying in the favor of your prospective employment references (particularly former bosses) is critical to your future employment success. The reference-checking firm of Allison & Taylor notes that approximately half of all reference checks they conduct reveal negative input from the references. Consider that a greeting card could prove to be a small, but critical, investment in your professional future.

5. Developing and maintaining positive relationships with your management team, coworkers and former bosses will ultimately be a cornerstone of success in your career. Besides the use of greeting cards, there are a number of effective etiquette tips that may be appropriate for those who may ultimately become your professional references

ips for sending the right holiday greeting card:

While sending out holiday cards is almost certainly a good idea, even this generous gesture can backfire if the proper protocols aren't observed. Here are some additional guidelines to ensure your card is well received:

1. Choose a high-quality holiday card that allows no possibility of offending its recipient. Remember that not everyone celebrates Christmas—be mindful of religious and cultural nuances, particularly with your international recipients.

2. Choose a design that is appropriate for your business associates.

3. Keep your contact list accurate and up-to-date. Make sure you're not sending a card to someone who has left the department or the company.

4. Check the spelling of your contacts and their corporate name. Any good points you'll score with a holiday card will be lost if you misspell your contact's name or corporate information.

5. Include one of your business cards inside the greeting card. This small insertion ensures that your recipients have your most current contact information and will reinforce your name with the card's recipient.

6. Be sure that your inscriptions on the outside of the card are both legible and attractive. Consider using a form of calligraphy to make your recipient's name and address visibly pleasing. Also, be sure to include your return address on the mailing envelope.

7. Sign each card personally. It only takes a moment to sign your name and write a short greeting, and your business associates will notice and appreciate this more personal gesture.

8. Don't be late. In life and in business, timing is everything. Remember that many companies close during the holidays and people take vacation to be with family, so send your cards early. Also note the possibility that a recipient of your card may want (out of consideration or guilt) to respond with a card back to you prior to the holidays. Aim to have all your corporate holiday cards in the mail no later than December 15 if you're sending them within the U.S., or earlier if you're sending them via international mail.

A properly thought-out and created holiday card can be a wonderful asset to your business relationships. Take the time to make this personal gesture, and it will be sure to be appreciated and remembered.

Posted on: 2015/12/18 22:22
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3 Unexpected New Ways to Revamp Your Resume
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3 Unexpected New Ways to Revamp Your Resume

1. Switch your resume with a colleague.
Your colleagues are actually one of your best resources when it comes to putting together an amazing resume—after all, they’re familiar with your skills, experiences, qualifications, work-place, and field in a way that no one else (not even your best friend or spouse) can come close to.

So getting their feedback is a no-brainer. To make it mutually beneficial, ask if you can swap resumes; you can tell them what’s working and what’s not, and vice versa.

You can either ask a current or former coworker. Whether you’re searching for jobs or just want to keep your resume up-to-date, we suggest you ask like this:

“Would you be willing to exchange resumes and give each other feedback? Although I’m not currently on the job hunt, I’d love to keep my resume current!”

This will protect you from rumors you could be leaving—whether those rumors would be true or not.

2. Explain your resume to a five year old.
Pretending you’re talking to a child is a classic way of turning convoluted, overly complex statements into simple, easy-to-understand ones.

This technique comes in handy for resumes, since most people use 10 words where five would be perfect (and more impactful!)

To use it, go through each resume bullet and re-state it as though you were talking to a five year old. Take this line: “Represented program to governance committees and elicited governance support for resources necessary for the implementation of recommended plans.”

If talking to a kid, you might say, “I told a committee how my team’s plan was going. When my team needed tools, I explained why.”

Obviously, that’s way too simplistic for a resume, but it helps you cut the wordiness. Your end result should be something in between the five year old version and the original, like: “Kept governance committee up-to-date on the program’s progress and necessary resources.”

3. Have your resume professionally edited.
Many job seekers have no idea there are professional services that will completely overhaul your resume: its design and layout, its content, or both. These services can be a great option if you haven’t touched your resume for five plus years and you have no idea what employers love to see, would like to see, or hate to see

Posted on: 2015/6/15 22:46
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Unemployed? Don't Overlook These Local Resources At Your Disposal
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Unemployed? Don't Overlook These Local Resources At Your Disposal


Losing your job may feel like the end of the world. In a matter of minutes, you have become one of almost 9.8 million unemployed Americans. You worry about your mortgage. You worry about your kids. You experience a spectrum of emotions: panic, disbelief, anger, sadness, and resignation. Then, you settle down and get to work finding a new position. Sure, it’s going to be rough, but you don’t have to go it alone. Consider these free resources, many of them local and at your disposal.

Calithera Biosciences SRA / Scientist - Biology
Global Blood Therapeutics Scientist - Bioanalysis
Eli Lilly Senior Chemist FDE
Promega Product Specialist - Cell Analysis
William Blair & Company Equity Research Associate
Start with the Department of Labor and Employment. A quick Google search will connect you to the website for your state. You’ll find layoff transition services, job search hotlines, information on state-sponsored employment events and links to city Workforce centers as well as other potentially helpful resources. You may have access to workshops and information on financial and stress management while unemployed, resume writing, using the Internet in your job search, identifying transferrable skills, collecting unemployment insurance, and the Dislocated Worker Program.

Move on to the local workforce center. Each one operates in conjunction with the unemployment office. In most cases, you must register with the workforce center in order to receive unemployment insurance benefits. Once you’ve registered, you can participate in their free workshops. Topics may include career exploration, updating your resume, creative job searching, using social media sites, interviewing skills, and career transitions for job seekers over 50. Many centers offer free walk-in resume critique sessions as well.

If you haven’t looked for a job in awhile, you may find helpful classes at the local public library. Many have begun offering free classes on using the Internet in your job search, writing resumes and cover letter, networking, and interviewing.

If your computer skills are a little outdated (or even nonexistent), don’t overlook the local community college. You are likely to find free courses for job seekers exploring basic computing, use of email, word processing, and spreadsheets. Many community colleges allow locals to audit regular courses free as well (if space is available), so you may be able to brush up on math, science, and English composition.

If you developed close relationships with your coworkers, you may find yourself missing more than a steady paycheck. Make new friends and get emotional support by joining an unemployment support or networking group. You can visit unemployed.meetup.com to search for groups in your area. Meet with other professionals and discuss your job search, get resume feedback, and network.

The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training sponsors CareerOneStop. Visit the website at www.careeronestop.org and explore careers, learn about relocating, find information on unemployment insurance, take self-assessment tests, get resume and cover letter advice, brush up on your interview skills, and more. You can also search state job banks.

You’ll find a wealth of helpful job search information online at websites such as Glassdoor as well. Visit www.glassdoor.com to get the inside scoop on jobs and companies. Browse job listings, research salaries, and then visit the blog for hundreds of articles covering virtually everything you need to know to maximize your job search.

In the past two years, media has reported falling unemployment rates in some segments of the country. This news may points to an improvement in the unemployment rate nationwide. You have skills employers need. There are jobs available. These free resources will help you connect with them as well as put your best foot forward when you do so.

Posted on: 2014/6/27 15:46
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The 10 Worst Things You Can Do when You Start a New Job
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The 10 Worst Things You Can Do when You Start a New Job

Newbie no-no #1: Bringing in a batch of your famous cookies. Everyone who tastes your choco-pecan fudgernutters loves them, so how could it be wrong to wow your new coworkers with them too? Unfortunately, baked goods won't help you rise in the workplace.


Instead: Act however the higher-ups do. If your boss is a banana-bread-baking fiend, sure, bring in treats once in a while, but not often. It's better to be known for your work than your goodies.

Instead: Ask polite questions about procedures. Say to coworkers, "I notice you create reports using process X-can you explain why?" If you still see room for improvement, offer up suggestions rather than speaking in absolutes: "In the past, I've seen process Z get reports done faster; has it been tried here before?"
Newbie no-no #2: Recommending changes right away. But they said they look forward to your new ideas! "Even when people say they want change, they don't want it overnight

Newbie no-no #3: Befriending the welcome-wagon folks. Being too open with colleagues before you know them well can backfire. If they're not trustworthy.

Instead: Stick to small talk. The weather, sports and that zombie show are safe topics.


Newbie no-no #4: Acting super-confident. Nobody likes a cowering coworker, but don't "name-drop about where you went to school or who you worked with before

Instead: Do more asking than telling. Find out how people wound up in their jobs and what they like about their positions. If they help you learn the ropes, thank them profusely, and share their efforts with the higher-ups. You'll be seen as a team player-and the team will have your back.


Newbie no-no #5: Accepting projects without asking questions. It's natural to want to look like you get it. But agreeing to fill out a TPS report-when you don't know what a TPS report is-can lead to big mistakes. This will make your boss feel you've wasted time,

Instead: Research what you can; then, think through the project's steps. Google key terms and examples. Next, visualize the desired end result of your task and come up with a general plan of attack. "After that, ask your boss to help you fill in blanks," suggests Engel. "You'll show you're a self-starter but also not afraid to ask questions."

Newbie no-no #6: Saying repeatedly how much better your new employer is than your old one. Your coworkers will lap up tales of your last company's faults. Then, they'll focus on yours. "If you're badmouthing your last place, what will you eventually say about them?

Instead: Only say how much you like the new place. People will feel you're grateful for the current opportunity, not grousing about what came before.

Newbie no-no #7: Trying too hard to stand out.

Instead: Respect the official and unofficial dress codes-don't test how well jeggings will go over if everyone else wears slacks. When the "who wants to take on…?" begins at a meeting, resist raising your hand, at least for your first few weeks on the job. "In time, the job will grow with you," says Brady.

Newbie no-no #8: Making yourself available at all hours. Setting boundaries early is crucial.

Instead: Take several weeks to understand your workplace's rhythms; then, set reasonable limits. "If you don't answer emails after 8 PM and before 8 AM and while you're on vacation, people will respect that if you stick to it


Newbie no-no #9: Staying at your desk at all times. Are you manning a cannon? If not, remaining glued in your seat through lunch is silly. You'll miss chances to network and seem standoffish. Plus, people will soon expect you to willingly forgo your midday break.

Instead: Go to lunch sometimes; invite out coworkers and exchange useful information. It's also fine to run the occasional personal errand.

Newbie no-no #10: Going online during your spare time because your coworkers do.Your days will probably have lulls as you get up and running. It's tempting to use those quiet times to hop on social media (oh, hey, Grumpy Cat), but just because everyone else is doing it doesn't mean you should.

Instead: Ask your manager if she needs anything done, or ask colleagues about their roles and responsibilities, recommends

Posted on: 2014/1/9 20:42
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Where the Jobs Will (and Won't) Be in 2014
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Where the Jobs Will (and Won't) Be in 2014

Where The Jobs Will Be In 2014


1. Deltona, FL
Net employment outlook: 24%

2. McAllen TX
Net employment outlook: 23%

3. (tie) Austin
Net employment outlook: 20%

3. (tie) Cape Coral, FL
Net employment outlook: 20%

4. Dallas
Net employment outlook: 19%

*******************************

Where The Jobs Won't Be In 2014


1. Buffalo
Net employment outlook: -3%

2. (tie) Chicago
Net employment outlook: 0%

2. (tie) Hartford
Net employment outlook: 0%

2. (tie) Memphis
Net employment outlook: 0%

3. (tie) Boise, ID
Net employment outlook: 3%

Posted on: 2013/12/20 20:14
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6 booming careers for the next decade
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6 booming careers for the next decade


Field #1: Big Data

Big Data is the term used to describe the enormous amount of data that companies are accumulating thanks to advanced computer technology. They've been collecting information on customer and population habits, trends, preferences, and other key subjects for a decade or more.

Projected Growth 2010 to 2020:* 31 percent

Median Annual Salary:** $77,080. The top 10 percent of database administrators makes $118,720, while the lowest 10 percent makes $42,930.

Education Requirements: Most database administrators have a bachelor's degree in management information systems or a computer-related field.

Field #2: Physical Therapy

Projected Growth 2010 to 2020:* 46 percent

Median Annual Salary:** $52,160. The top 10 percent of physical therapy assistants makes $72,720, while the lowest 10 percent makes $32,420.

Education Requirements: Most states require physical therapy assistants to complete an associate's degree from an accredited physical therapist program.

Field #3: Medical Technicians

Medical technicians offer an answer to cutting down costs and freeing up doctors and nurses to spend more time with patientsn.

These health care professionals often run sophisticated diagnostic machines to complete MRIs, ultrasounds, and echocardiograms instead of using more invasive equipment.

Projected Growth 2010 to 2020:* 44 percent

Median Annual Salary:** $65,860. The top 10 percent of diagnostic medical sonographers makes $91,070, while the lowest 10 percent makes $44,990.

Education Requirements: diagnostic medical sonographers need either an associate's degree or a postsecondary certificate. Many employers also require candidates to have professional certification.

Field #4: Teachers

Projected Growth 2010 to 2020:* 17 percent

Median Annual Salary:** $53,400. The top 10 percent of elementary school teachers makes $83,160, while the lowest 10 percent makes $35,630.

Education Requirements: Every state requires public elementary school teachers to have a bachelor's degree in elementary education and a license. Private school teachers do not have the same requirements, but most private schools seek teachers with a bachelor's in elementary education.

Field #5: Sales & Marketing

Projected Growth 2010 to 2020:* 41 percent

Median Annual Salary:** $60,300. The top 10 percent of market research analysts makes $113,500, while the lowest 10 percent makes $33,280.

Education Requirements: Market research analysts usually need a bachelor's degree in market research or a related field. Many people in these positions have degrees in statistics, computer science, or math, while others have a background in business administration, communications, or one of the social sciences.

Posted on: 2013/12/12 20:34
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5 top jobs no woman has ever had
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5 top jobs no woman has ever had


CEO of a top U.S. bank


Chief Justice

Vice President

President


Posted on: 2013/11/20 21:05
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6 high-paying work-from-home careers
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6 high-paying work-from-home careers

Career #1: Applications Software Developer

Career #2: Market Research Analyst

Career #3: Accountant

Career #4: Graphic Designer

Career #5: Personal Financial Advisor

Career #6: PR Specialist

Posted on: 2013/10/29 19:57
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